Flower Votive Holders Made With Pistachio Shells

This is a great idea. you could even paint or dye the shells to go with different occasions. This would make a nice casual fall wedding table center piece.

These are pistachio shells! To make your own flowering set of votive holders, cut a 3-inch circle from a piece of cardboard. Hot-glue pistachio shells around the edge of the cardboard, pointing the shells slightly upward. Hot-glue a second row of shells outside the first, keeping them flat and tucking them between the first row (conceal as much of the cardboard as possible). Hot-glue a third row inside the first row slightly more upright. Finally, hot-glue pistachios to the metal around the candle and place it in the center. We left our pistachios natural, but you could paint or dip in dye if desired.

Source: Better Homes & Gardens

Candle Holder Branches DIY Crafts

Got a saw, a drill bit, and access to some thin tree logs? You’ve got a rustic-look candle display perfect for lighting a fall feast.

Use a vise to secure a flat-cut log; mark the center and drill straight down into the log, about 2 inches deep. Any rough edges can be sanded.

Editor’s Tip: To turn this craft into a waterproof flower vase, drill hole to fit a thin glass tube and pop inside before adding mums or fall flowers.

Source: Better Homes & Gardens

Kaffe “Fassett-nator” Anniversary Contest

To celebrate Kaffe’s 20th anniversary with Rowan we are giving away 20 bolts of The Kaffe Fassett Collective fabric and lots more to the winner of the Kaffe Fassett-nator Anniversary Contest.

SHOW US YOUR KAFFE FASSETT-NATOR! 

To celebrate Kaffe’s 20th anniversary designing fabric with Rowan we are giving away 20 bolts of The Kaffe Fassett Collective fabric OR a Pfaff Quilt Ambition 2.0 Sewing Machine to the winner of the Kaffe Fassett-nator Anniversary Contest. Second and third place prizes are also being awarded. Here’s what you need to know…

Source: Kaffe “Fassett-nator” Anniversary Contest | Make It Coats

FREE Stylish Piecing and Sewing Tote Pattern

A stylish and sturdy tote perfectly sized for everyday use. This season’s bloom is Flora, a floral medley not to be forgotten. Romantic and bold florals are the original classic and this bouquet of striking fabric prints arrives with a slightly vintage feel that promises to remain fresh and timeless. Thanks to whimsical designs, lush backdrops and darker graphics, this year’s flowers are modern and most definitely cutting-edge.

Finished Size: 13”L x 15”W (33.02 cm x 38.10cm)

  • Brands: FreeSpirit Fabric
  • Crafting time: Weekend
  • Designers: Joy McKeon, Joel Dewberry
  • End use: Bags / Purses
  • Complexity: Intermediate
  • Technique: Piecing, Sewing

Free piecing and sewing tote pattern from FreeSpirit Fabrics using Joel Dewberry’s cotton sateen fabric collection Flora.

Source: Piecing and Sewing Tote Pattern | Make It Coats

Craft Ideas Projects Autumn Wreath


Fall is a favorite time of year, with leaves falling and friends stopping by for cider. This bright, cheery fall wreath will welcome guests to your home.

Materials

  • Paper: Core’dinations Tim Holtz Kraft-Core Nostalgic Collection, Imaginisce Bushel o’ Fall Collection, or other solid and patterned papers in fall colors
  • Imaginisce Bushel o’ Fall Collection Bling and Die Cuts
  • Thin cardboard
  • Paper doily, 6” diameter
  • Raffia
  • Burlap (for hanger)

Basic Supplies

paper trimmer, ruler, sandpaper, scissors

Tools

  • Xyron 9” Creative Station
  • Xyron Teresa Collins Adhesive Kit
  • Xyron Teresa Collins Stapler
  • Provo Craft Cricut Cuttlebug and Polka Dot Page Embossing Folder
  • Imaginisce i-bond Glue Gun Tool and glue sticks

Directions

  • Size
  • 1. Size is 16” diameter.
  • Autumn Wreath
  • 1. Cut 5”x5” patterned paper square. Roll into cone shape; adhere with Xyron Teresa Collins Stapler or hot glue gun. Repeat to make 15 additional cones from assorted patterned papers.
  • 2. Cut 5”x5” cardstock square. Emboss using Cuttlebug. Lightly sand raised pattern, then roll into cone shape. Adhere with Xyron Teresa Collins Stapler or hot glue gun. Repeat to make five additional embossed cones from assorted cardstock.
  • 3. Cut 5”x5” cardboard square; run through Xyron 9” Creative Station. (Note: This is a great way to recycle a cereal box, etc.) Leaving center open area smaller than doily, dry fit cones around cardboard in desired pattern. When desired placement of cones is achieved, firmly press cones to cardboard to adhere in place. (Note: More cones can be created and added to fill in gaps if necessary.)
  • 4. Fold raffia on itself several times; trim and nestle between cones. Secure with hot glue gun.
  • 5. Using doily as reference, cut patterned paper circle smaller than doily; adhere to center of doily with tape runner from Xyron Teresa Collins Adhesive Kit. Stack several layers of adhesive foam squares from Xyron Teresa Collins Adhesive Kit in open center of wreath. Adhere doily to foam squares.
  • 6. Embellish doily with die cuts and gems; adhere with foam tape from Xyron Teresa Collins Adhesive Kit.
  • 7. To create hanger, cut strip of burlap to desired length; tie into bow. Adhere burlap to cardboard back.
  • Tip
  • 1. Rolling papers into cones is a simple task when you use a Xyron Teresa Collins Stapler.

by Cari Locken for Xyron, Inc.

Source: Craft Ideas : Projects : Details : autumn-wreath

FREE Knit Fingerless Gloves Pattern

Fun and feminine, this Knit Fingerless Gloves Pattern has fashion well in hand.

Lacy Knit Fingerless Mitts

When you need a little extra warmth on your hands, these mitts will do the trick.

Knit Fingerless Gloves PatternKnit Fingerless Gloves Pattern
Knit Fingerless Gloves PatternKnit Fingerless Gloves Pattern

Materials

  • 1 ball Juniper Moon Farm Findley in color #29 (Greengage)
  • Set of 5 double-point needles in size 2 (2.75 mm)
  • 2 stitch markers
  • Contrasting scrap yarn, or a stitch holder
  • Tapestry needle
  • Scissors

Instructions

KNIT ABBREVIATIONS:

k  knit
p  purl
k2tog   knit 2 stitches together (decrease)
kfb      knit into front and back of stitch (increase)
ssk      slip, slip, knit (decrease)
yo     yarn over
[ ]    repeat directions inside brackets as indicated

GAUGE:
30 sts and 42 rows = 4 in. in stockinette stitch in the round.
25-1/2 sts and 52 rows = 4 in. in lace pattern after blocking.
Make sure to check your gauge and adjust needle size to match gauge.

Note: Mitt chart rounds are read from right to left.

DIRECTIONS (make 2)

Cuff:
Cast on 84 (96) sts and join for working in the round, being careful not to twist row; place marker to indicate end of round.
Round 1: K.
Round 2: K.
Round 3: [K2tog twice, kfb four times, ssk twice] to end of round.
Round 4: K.
Round 5: [K2tog twice, k4, ssk twice] to end of round: 56 (64) sts.
Round 6: K.
Round 7: P.
Round 8: K.
Round 9: K1, [p2, k2] to 3 sts before end of round, p2, k1.
Rounds 10-28:  Repeat round 9.
Size S only:  Round 29: K2tog, k26, k2tog, k to end of round:  54 sts.
Size L only:  Round 29: K to end of round.
Both sizes:
Round 30:  P to end of round.
Round 31:  K to end of round.

Hand – thumb gusset:
Round 1: K4, place marker to indicate end of gusset, [work row 1 of chart] to end of round.
Round 2: K.
Round 3: Kfb twice, k2, [work row 2 of chart] to end of round: 56 (66) sts.
Round 4: K.
Round 5: K to marker, [work row 3 of chart] to end of round.
Round 6: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 58 (68) sts.
Round 7: K to marker, [work row 4 of chart] to end of round.
Round 8: K.
Round 9: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k2, [work row 5 of chart] to end of round: 60 (70) sts.
Round 10: K.
Round 11: K to marker, [work row 6 of chart] to end of round.
Round 12: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 62 (72) sts.
Round 13: K to marker, [work row 7 of chart] to end of round.
Round 14: K.
Round 15: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k2, [work row 8 of chart] to end of round: 64 (74) sts.
Round 16: K.
Round 17: K to marker, [work row 1 of chart] to end of round.
Round 18: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 66 (76) sts.
Round 19: K to marker, [work row 2 of chart] to end of round.
Round 20: K.
Round 21: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k2, [work row 3 of chart] to end of round: 68 (78) sts.
Round 22: K.
Round 23: K to marker, [work row 4 of chart] to end of round.
Round 24: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 70 (80) sts.
Round 25: K to marker, [work row 5 of chart] to end of round.
Round 26: K.
Round 27: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k2, [work row 6 of chart] to end of round: 72 (82) sts.
Round 28: K.
Round 29: K to marker, [work row 7 of chart] to end of round.
Round 30: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 74 (84) sts.
Round 31: K to marker, [work row 8 of chart] to end of round.
Round 32: K.
Size L only:
Round 33: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k2, [work row 1 of chart] to end of round: 86 sts.
Round 34: K.
Round 35: K to marker, [work row 2 of chart] to end of round.
Round 36: Kfb, k to 3 sts before marker, kfb, k to end of round: 88 sts.
Round 37: K to marker, [work row 3 of chart] to end of round.
Round 38: K.
Both sizes:
Next round: K1, slip next 21 (25) sts onto scrap yarn or stitch holder, cast on 1 st, k2, [work row 1 (row 4) of chart] to end of round: 54 (64) sts.

Hand – after gusset:
Round 1: K.
Round 2: K to marker, [work row 2 (row 5) of chart] to end of round.
Round 3: K2, k2tog, k to 1 st before end of round, slip 1 purlwise, remove marker, slip next st purlwise, knit these two sts together through the back loop, place marker to indicate new end of round: 52 (62) sts.
Round 4: K to marker, [work row 3 (row 6) of chart] to end of round.
Round 5: K2tog, k to 1 st before end of round, slip 1 purlwise, remove marker, slip next st purlwise, knit these two sts together through the back loop, existing marker indicates new end of round: 50 (60) sts.
Round 6: [Work row 4 (row 7) of chart] to end of round.
Round 7: K.
Round 8: [Work row 5 (row 8) of chart] to end of round.
Round 9: K.
Round 10: [Work row 6 (row 1) of chart] to end of round.
Round 11: K.
Round 12: [Work row 7 (row 2) of chart] to end of round.
Round 13: K.
Round 14: [Work row 8 (row 3) of chart] to end of round.
Round 15: K.
Size L only:
Round 16: [Work row 4 of chart] to end of round.
Round 17: K.
Both sizes: Rounds 16-25 (18-27):  [K1, p1] to end of round.

Bind off all sts loosely in rib.
Cut yarn, leaving a 6-to-8-in. tail, and draw through last st.

Thumb:
Pick up and knit one st in the cast-on st at base of thumb, k 21 (25) held sts, join for working in the round, place marker to indicate end of round: 22 (26) sts.

Knit 8 (10) rounds.
[K1, p1] for 4 rounds.

Bind off all sts loosely in rib.
Cut yarn, leaving a 6-to-8-in. tail, and draw through last st.

Finishing:
Weave in all ends.  Block lightly.

FINISHED SIZES:
Mitts can be made in two sizes. Small mitt has a circumference of 7-3/4 in. Large mitt has a circumference of 9-1/2 in.  Pattern is written for small size, with large-size instructions in parentheses. The large size also includes some extra rounds, as noted.

Knit Fingerless Gloves Pattern designed by Adrienne Ku. Photography by Susan Gibbs.

Craft provided by Juniper Moon Farm.

Source: Knit Fingerless Gloves Pattern | Knitting Crafts | Spring Crafts | Love the Country

Peach Melba Cupcakes

Peach Melba is a timeless dessert that features peaches, raspberries and vanilla ice cream. It was created by the famous French chef, Auguste Escoffier, for his friend Nellie Melba, an Australian opera singer. Classic Peach Melba demands perfectly ripe, juicy peaches, which are in season for just a few short weeks each year, but with Treatology Juicy Peach Flavor, you can make perfect Peach Melba cupcakes all year long. Beating raspberries into the icing adds a pretty color as well as flavor.

Source: Wilton.com

How to Create Depth in Art – Artist’s Network

How do you create depth in art? Lee Hammond has the answers for portraying distance in landscape drawings and paintings.

A Tip For Creating Depth in Art

When drawing or painting landscapes, you always want to work back to front, starting with the sky first. Many beginners want to get right in there and draw the subject first, but that’s not affective. By perfecting the background first, things can then be applied and overlapped. You NEVER want to draw something in and then try to put the background in later, around it. It will show.

Landscape drawing tips from Lee Hammond at ArtistsNetwork.com

In landscapes, things become lighter in color and less detailed as they go further away. As you can see in my buffalo drawing, the further back you go, the more pale it becomes. The darkness of the buffalo in the foreground then creates contrast, and makes them look closer to you. I love the sense of depth in this drawing!

How to paint or draw landscapes, at ArtistsNetwork.com

The is a painting (at right) I recently did in an acrylic landscape class I taught. It was to teach these very principles of depth and distance. If you look closely, you can see how I applied the paint in gradual horizontal layers, starting with the sky, and then working down into the many atmospheric layers. This painting really shows the depth and power of that horizontal application.

Source: How to Create Depth in Art – Artist’s Network